ICS Opposes Proposed 710 Freeway Tunnel

Published on: July 31, 2015

Written by: ICS

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InnerCity Struggle opposes the proposed 710 freeway tunnel that would run from El Sereno to Pasadena because it would not reduce traffic in the area and would worsen air quality for thousands of residents.


The proposed tunnel would start where the 710 northbound freeway lanes end at Valley Boulevard in Alhambra. It would pass underneath hundreds of El Sereno homes and disproportionately impact the neighborhood that includes El Sereno Arroyo Playground where many children play daily. Bringing more traffic to an area where children live would put them at an increased risk for such health problems as asthma and cancer.


Furthermore, according to Beyond 710, an organization that supports alternatives to the proposed tunnel, the project would not only devastate communities, it would be a massive waste of money that could be much better spent on different projects. Caltrans’ and Metro’s own studies show that the billions of dollars would not appreciably improve anyone’s commute, and would add to further congestion on already overloaded freeways.


ICS encourages Caltrans/Metro to adopt options to close the gap between the 710 and 210 freeways that would increase public transportation, green spaces, and access to jobs, as well as ease congestion and improve routes for pedestrians and bicyclists.

 

ICS encourages you to submit comments against the proposed tunnel to Caltrans/Metro. The deadline to comment on the SR-710 North Draft Environmental Impact Report (EIR) is Wednesday, Aug. 5: http://www.sr710northcomments.com/ 

 

ICS is also mobilizing Eastside residents to attend a community discussion on a public health review of the EIR. Sponsored by Los Angeles County Supervisor Hilda Solis, the meeting will take place Monday, Aug. 3 from 6 – 7:30 pm at the East Los Angeles Library, 4837 E. 3rd Street, Los Angeles, CA 90022. L.A. County Department of Public Health officials and USC Keck School of Medicine faculty members will speak on a panel and answer questions.




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